Thursday, May 21, 2015

Alltech REBELation week comes to a close and I have more of commitment than ever to U.S. Beef

One thing is sure after this weeks Alltech ‪#‎REBELation‬ week. The U.S. beef system can not be matched in Corn Fed well marbled beef. The production efficiency that brought us to the dance must be maintained. NO APOLOGIES only full steam ahead.



US farmer says hormoned beef must be part of TTIP deal


The proposed free trade agreement between the US and Europe (TTIP) should allow for the export of hormone treated beef from America to Europe, according to Nebraska-based farm broadcaster and farmer Trent Loos.

"I am all for free trade in both directions," he said.

link to whole story


Wednesday, April 29, 2015

Finally a major media outlet Julie Hyman with Bloomberg TV roots out real farming facts


​In January 2015 Chipotle garnered many headlines when they announced they could not find enough pork to meet their production standards. 

Julie Hyman Bloomberg TV decided she wanted to see for herself exactly what the differences where in pig rearing and packed her crew, camera and headed for Iowa to visit two farms.

Watch this Bloomberg TV news segment with what she found.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dl-QfXYJHeI

Then she joined Trent Loos on his Loos Trails and Tales radio program discussing in great detail exactly what the "city girl" thought about modern pig farms. 

Loos Trails and Tales April 28, 2015 Julie Hyman reporter for Bloomberg TV goes to the pig farm one large one Chipotle supplier", click here to listen.

Thank you Julie Hyman and Bloomberg TV for presenting the most accurate news story about modern food production I have witnessed in major media.

Trent Loos


Thursday, April 23, 2015

Presentation tonight at Luther College

> Mr Merrit
>
> It has come to my attention that you will be making a presentation tonight that has local farmers stirred.
>
> I host several radio programs and would like to arrange a follow up interview tomorrow morning about this evenings activities.
>
> 8 am central would work great for me and my number is 515 418-8185
>
> Thank you
> Trent Loos
>
> www.LoosTales.com

Wednesday, April 15, 2015

Farm Animals help immunize your kids

From the U.S.Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health.

The prevalence of asthma and other atopic diseases has recently increased, especially in urban and modernized regions of the world. The majority of published prevalence surveys report that asthma and atopy are less common among children living in rural areas. While many exposures differ in rural and urban areas of the world, several recent studies have suggested that agricultural exposures in early childhood may decrease the risk of developing atopic disease. Livestock exposure, in particular, seems to be important, but additional research is needed to pinpoint the underlying mechanisms behind this apparent protective effect of rural and farm living. Additionally, prospective studies are needed to more closely examine the timing of farm exposures in relation to the onset of asthma and atopy, and to determine if the apparent protective effects of farming persist into adulthood.


Asthma and Atopy in Rural Children: Is Farming Protective?

Tuesday, April 14, 2015

Farming improves overall health

Farmers in many countries, including the United States, have lower overall death rates and cancer rates than the general population. Lower death rates among farmers for heart diseaseand cancers of the lungesophagusbladder, and colon, in particular, are thought to be due, at least in part, to lower smoking rates, as well as more physically active lifestyles and dietary factors.

Agricultural Health Study

What is the Agricultural Health Study?

In 1993, scientists from the National Cancer Institute, the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) began a research project known as the Agricultural Health Study (AHS) to evaluate the role of agricultural exposures in the development of cancer and other diseases in members of the farming community. The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health joined the study in 2000.

The AHS is also providing an opportunity to assess the effects of diet, cooking methods, and other lifestyle and genetic factors on the risks of cancer and other diseases. The results will provide information that can be used to create a safe work environment and a healthy lifestyle for agricultural workers and their families.

Link to entire report